WHEELS

magictransistor:

Georg Brentel, Magic Circles and Portable Sundials (Engraving); Lauingen, Germany, 1619.

magictransistor:

Georg Brentel, Magic Circles and Portable Sundials (Engraving); Lauingen, Germany, 1619.

(via bookeofhowrs)

— 2 hours ago with 309 notes
Playing D&D With Porn Stars: My Mongrel Game →

Saves will be as 3.5 because come on AD&D. Wands, staves and rods?

— 2 hours ago
#d&d  #house rules 
"Rather than letting our faith dictate our politics, we’ve gotten to the point for many of us where we’re letting our politics — typically what the Republican Party says — dictate our faith,” Katharine Hayhoe, an evangelical Christian who is a climate scientist at Texas Tech University, said in a telephone interview. “Caring about God’s creation and caring about God’s people is entirely consistent with caring for your neighbor."
— 16 hours ago
#finally 

Jean Leidloff : The Continuum Concept

(Source: youtube.com)

— 1 day ago
#parenting 
False Machine: Liking Things →

If you listen to someone talk about someone they really love, that light goes on in their eyes, they drift a bit. Write down what they say. read it back alter on. They sound a bit thick. They aren’t. There is something bigger going on. the words are just part of it.

Hearing them talk about why they hate something usually feels like you are watching a machine work. Something precise, toothed and efficient. Internal. The actions of the mind on a disembodied thing. I always sound clever when I’m angry. I am fluent in contempt. 

— 4 days ago
benrobertsphoto:

Tonight’s wedding venue, last night. (at Silk Mill)

benrobertsphoto:

Tonight’s wedding venue, last night. (at Silk Mill)

— 5 days ago with 3 notes

Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry or Très Riches Heures is probably the most important illuminated manuscript of the 15th century, “le roi des manuscrits enluminés” (“the king of illuminated manuscripts”). It is a very richly decorated Book of Hours containing over 200 folios, of which about half are full page illustrations.

It was painted sometime between 1412 and 1416 by the Limbourg brothers for their patron Jean, Duc de Berry . They left it unfinished at their (and the Duke’s) death in 1416. Charles I, Duke I of Savoy commissioned Jean Colombe to finish the paintings between 1485-1489.

Wikimedia

(Source: theallseeingcat, via bookeofhowrs)

— 1 week ago with 400 notes

speakingparts:

Pieter Bruegel the Elder - The Triumph of Death

(via bookeofhowrs)

— 1 week ago with 677 notes